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Durandir
Name: Durandir
Website: My Website[s]
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Knitting WIPs:

- Dishcloth-stitch Bathmat
- JCL Dishcloths
- Periwinkle Surplice Top-Down Raglan inspired by Mom's sweater
- Anemoi Mittens (sort of on hold now that it's...warm out.)
- More Mason-Dixon Ballband Dishcloths
- Snicket Socks
- Diagonal Rib Socks
- Icarus Shawl

Recent FOs:

- JCL Dishcloths
- Jolie Socks
- Twinkle Toes Socks
- Jolie Cardigan
- Blue Toe-Up Socks
- Mason-Dixon Baby Kimono (Green/Yellow)
- Mason-Dixon Baby Kimono (Apricot)
- Purple Felted Bucket Hat
- Poppy Sweater
- Mason-Dixon Ballband Dishcloths
- Vigo Ribbed Socks
- Pansy Gloves
- Burgundy Felted Bucket Hat
- Widdershins Socks
- Starburst Sweater
- Teeny Tiny Felted Tote
- Booga Bag
- Clapomitaines
- Flacon Lace Doily
- Jaywalker Socks
- Kt's Scarf
- Felted Piano Tote Bag (x2)
- Seraphim Shawl
- Piano Swatch Purselet
- Eleanora Socks
- Well-Dressed Wheel
- Twisted Rib Socks
- Clapotis
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I'm not really the Queen of Mendellia, but I do play one in Terra Group
terrathree
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I am on a baking kick lately. It started with cake mixes and brownie mixes, thus the title, whipped up quick on Thursday nights to feed the hungry JCLers at Certamen practices on Fridays. I've made cupcakes, brownies, a pound cake, etc., all easy enough to build confidence until I felt like trying some "real" baking. Sucked in by http://www.foodgawker.com, I've been bookmarking recipes that I like and finally got around to trying some! I made pumpkin scones a few weeks ago and they turned out well, so tonight for the Church Thanksgiving dinner I made them again, plus peppermint chocolate shortbread bars. Looks yummy!

Pumpkin scones (by durandir) Pumpkin scones (by durandir)
Peppermint Chocolate Shortbread Bars (by durandir) Peppermint Chocolate Shortbread Bars (by durandir)

However I've had enough sugar from licking the bowls and all so I am not yet up to trying the finished products. :-) Perhaps I will after tonight's dinner. I'm taking the extras to family Thanksgiving in St Charles, too.

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Ubi sum?: jville
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: productive productive

terrathree
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So I am working tonight on my translation of Eclogue 4 for Tuesday night's online Vergil class, and this is my new favorite Latin quote:

nec varios discet mentiri lana colores,
ipse sed in pratis aries iam suave rubenti
murice, iam croceo mutabit vellera luto,
sponte sua sandyx pascentis vestiet agnos.   


My translation:
Nor will the wool learn to pretend various colors; but the ram itself in the meadows will change its fleeces now with charming reddened shellfish, now with golden weld; of its own accord red dye will cloth the grazing lambs.


This is Vergil's eclogue prophesying a new golden age to mark the birth of a son and heir to Mark Antony and Octavia, a marriage arranged to cement the truce between Antony and Octavian after the civil wars following the assassination of Julius Caesar. The son turned out to be a girl and then, truce or no truce, Octavian won at Actium and Antony and his OTHER wife Cleopatra committed suicide, so I use the term "prophetic" loosely here. Of course in Christian antiquity it was thought this was actually prophesying a golden age following the birth of Jesus, for which Christians thought of Vergil as a sort of pre-Christian messianic prophet and revered him almost as much as the Bible at times, which is why he's the one who takes Dante on a tour of Hell in the Inferno...but I digress.

Anyway I was much amused by this detail of Vergil's new golden age: It will not be necessary to dye wool - making it look like something other than it really is, i.e. "mentiri - to lie" - because the sheep will grow colored wool "sua sponte" - of their own accord! And I was particularly pleased at Vergil's choice of dyes, for they are the ones I would choose were I to dye sock wool (actually, I have in my possession at this moment a Knitpicks Sock Blank and two jars of dye in these colors to do just that, once I work up the reckless abandon to actually try the dying process): purple and gold! JCL colors! "rubenti murice" means the red-purple dye made from shellfish which the Romans used for the toga picta and the purple stripe on the toga praetexta, etc. "croceo luto" means the yellow dye made from a plant called weld. Totally my colors! (As my Ravelry project pages will attest.) Oh, and also, the little lambs will be minding their own business ("pascentis" - grazing) when red dye ("sandyx") will spontaneously ("sponte sua") clothe them ("vestiet"). Red is not a JCL color but it would go nicely with them.

So this is my new favorite Latin quote, having replaced the one from Cicero (was it in the Pro Caelio?) about how untangling a complicated story of a witness in the trial was like untangling a ball of yarn. Latin authors, keep it up with the textile metaphors!

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Ubi sum?: chez moi
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: amused delighted

terrathree
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I have a new favorite sock pattern. Ironically...or coincidentally...or perhaps just quite fittingly, it is from this book:



That is one well named book. So many socks in it I'd like to knit...and have plenty of yarn to do so, thanks to Mom. She is the ideal handknit gift recipient: I've only made about four pairs of socks for her so far but she wears them constantly. Seems like every time I'm there on the weekends she is wearing socks I made. She shows them off to people and brags on them and makes them want to knit socks too. :-) So of course I am happy to make more socks for her, and I have some sock yarn in the stash to do so; but Mom specifically needed grey socks. So...we went over to http://www.knitpicks.com and Mom picked out some yarn. Enough to keep me knitting socks for quite a while! Several shades of grey and then she was unable to resist some pinks and burgundies too. :-) It's a win-win deal; Mom buys the yarn and I knit it. I get knitting to occupy me and she gets nice socks.

When the yarn arrived I was finishing up these socks for Kt:

Jeweled Steps Socks (by durandir)

But as soon as I finished those I started in on the yarn Mom had picked for her first pair. I was going through some of the books I have to choose a pattern and found several I liked in Favorite Socks. Not much of a hard choice really, considering I've got plenty of yarn to try out ALL the patterns I like, but I ended up starting with the Embossed Leaves pattern. And oh, I am in love! These are such adorable socks. I cast on last Wednesday and finished the first sock last night. That's just a week, but it usually takes me a lot longer than that to knit a sock when I am working on it mainly on school nights! I watched a few movies...and worked on it during my Tuesday night Vergil online class...and just basically had a hard time putting the needles down. There is something about a lace pattern that just flies along; it's like colorwork, where you have so much fun seeing what happens next that you lose track of how much time you've spent knitting. This pattern is a real page-turner.

Embossed Leaves Sock (by durandir)

It's not just the lace, though. A brief list of things I love about these socks:

  • Lace. It's not just the lace, but it is the lace, too.

  • Logical lace. After the first couple repeats I had the lace pattern pretty much memorized...and it's a SIXTEEN row pattern. I usually don't memorize stitch patterns of more than four rows or so that easily, but this one...after a while I could see how the leaves in the pattern were emerging, which stitch was forming the center spine of the leaf and where the increases were going to highlight the spine and where the decreases were going to shape the leaf's edge. It's just a pattern that makes sense; you can see where it's going and figure out what to do on the next row without having to memorize how many stitches between the YO and the K2tog.

  • The cast-on. It's a variation on the standard long-tail cast on that takes a bit of concentration because you alternate knit and purl stitches in that cast-on row. I kept losing track of which I had cast on last and which I needed to do next if I ever looked away from it. It ends up in a very refined looking edge on the sock, though.

  • The heel. Standard heel flap and heel turn and gusset...sort of. Except the heel flap is just straight knitting without reinforced stitches...I am a little doubtful about how well that will hold up to frequent wear, which is what Mom will give it, but oh it is pretty! So elegant, not puckery the way slip-stitch or eye-of-partridge reinforced heels tend to be. And then there's this little line of garter stitch down each side of the heel flap that mimics the purl lines between the lace patterns on the leg. It's unique and, again, kind of elegant.

  • The toe. It's a star toe of sorts, with four decrease points, but there are lines of purls mirroring the decreases and the purl line plus the decrease line etches out the tip of the last leaf from the lace pattern, so that instead of having the pattern on the foot stopping dead at the plain stockinette of the toe decreases, you have a seamless transition from foot to toe - and a nice fitting toe, too.


Just can't stop knitting these. After I finish the second sock in this pair I may have to make this pattern again in some of my own (not-for-Mom) sock yarn, because I really want to wear this sock. And I don't even usually like lace socks (I mean, the point of a sock is to keep my foot warm, not ventilated...).

Socks on Ravelry | Flickr

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Ubi sum?: chez moi
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: impressed impressed

terrathree
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My day in pictures.

This was the start of my day:

Closer:


This was the end of my day:
Fishelton Teams both won first place trophies! (by fishelton)
First place in both teams! (by fishelton)

Overall, a good day.

Today was Hoosier Certamen Invitational, the first competition of the year (there are no fall competitions) for my JCL kids. They have been practicing every Friday so this is when it all pays off. The day did not start too auspiciously however. Just as I was leaving my apartment to go to school and meet the kids for the drive over to the school hosting the meet...I backed out of my parking spot and before I could turn and drive off, a car driving out of the parking lot ran into me. Dented my rear driver side door, probably scratched the paint though under the wintry dust it's hard to tell at the moment...no other damage, and I wasn't hurt. Fortunately even when one is not looking out for cars backing out as one drives through the parking lot, one still doesn't drive terribly fast, so it's just a bit of a dent, as seen above. Definitely just cosmetic damage since I still managed to drive to certamen and back safely! The other car fared worse - the headlight on the corner of the car that hit me was torn off along with what appear to be some bits of metal or plastic from the light's housing (which are still, in fact, sitting in the driveway, I noticed when I got home from certamen; but I'm not going out tonight to confirm their structural composition for the curious. ;-) Anyway, no serious damage except to the schedule. I was leaving early enough to have had time to run in the building and have ten minutes or so to make sure I had everything I needed, before the kids would arrive...after the accident, by the time the police got there and did the accident report, I got to OUR school at just about the time we were supposed to be at the HOST school. Luckily the host was only 20-25 minutes away, in Noblesville, so we were not very late after all. But it was a very frazzling start to the day.

I only had two teams at this meet, since Latin I is gone. :-( Four of my Latin 2 honors kids played on the Intermediate team, and I had five Latin 3/4 students for the Advanced team; four is the limit to a team so the fifth girl - who is in Latin 3 not 4 - had to play on the wild card team instead. (Wild card teams are formed when the number of teams present isn't divisible by 2 or 3 to facilitate a round robin.) Poor girl, last year she had to do that too at one meet when none of the rest of her Latin 2 team was able to go so I didn't register a team for them!

So, we took two teams...you noticed the last picture above? Oh, am I a proud Magistra today. Both my teams came home with first place trophies! We won both the Intermediate and Advanced levels! We have had trophies before but never more than one in the same day. A few years ago, Denny's Latin 2 team...which means basically Denny himself...took first place at both invitational meets AND at state convention, and so far that has been our best season. (Last year our Novice - Latin 1 - team took first at the January meet but that was our only trophy of the year.) Two teams getting first at the same meet - I'm calling that our new record! Can you believe HSE is cutting the program when these kids are so amazing?!

So, I think the trophies make up well enough for the morning havoc.

More certamen photos (I offer no more car photos, bleh): Flickr Set

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Ubi sum?: chez moi
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: tired tired

terrathree
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I have a hat, in search of a name. I knit this hat for Uncle Bruce for Christmas, my own design. I wanted to try out starting a hat at the top and working down to have better control over the length of it, rather than casting on at the bottom edge, knitting up until it seemed about the right place to start shaping the crown, then working crown decreases and hoping they come out to make the hat the right length (which is what I usually do but it often results in a hat that seems too short, so I am maybe not a good judge of when it's a good time to start them...) So I knit this one from a tiny circular cast on at the crown, increasing out until it was big enough to fit round the head, then knitting straight down until it was long enough to fold up the brim. So the cables start out on just a few stitches right at the center of the crown, and as the hat grows they increase to bigger and bigger cables and finally cross over and twine with their neighbors. I made up the cables as I went but wrote it all down...and I would like to write up the pattern and post it here, only I can't think of a name for it! So here are pictures...can anyone suggest a good name for this hat?

Top Down Cable Hat (by durandir) Top Down Cable Hat (by durandir) Top Down Cable Hat (by durandir) Top Down Cable Hat (by durandir)

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Ubi sum?: chez moi
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: hopeful inquisitive

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What, do I still have a blog?

Anyway, we've been back to school a week now...busy as always, so I should've done some blogging while on Christmas break! I did not, nor did I do much grading until the last few days...I am afraid some of my grading stack did not get finished in time for exporting semester 1 grades for the report cards. It will have to go on the new grading period instead. The problem with having three French 1 classes is that any time I want them to practice their writing skills...and boy, do they need to practice those...I have nearly eighty French essays/paragraphs/worksheets to grade. Ouch! Between teaching six subjects this year*, having three of them combined in one hectic period**, and traveling between two high schools, I do good to get my lesson plans all done far enough in advance to send copies to the copy center. Grading...happens when it happens, which is not often. Oh, and this semester I'm taking another distance course through UF (Go Gators!) so there go my Tuesday evenings, and along with them my Monday evenings and probably at least one other evening to be used for doing the homework. (This week for the first assignment I worked on it three evenings in all...Tomorrow night is the second class and I am all set to go!) I didn't take last semester's course (it was Prose Composition which I had a few semesters ago...so I took a semester off on account of the six preps and everything) and it was nice to be a little less busy, but I'm sure I can manage a course this semester. For one thing, Etymology is a semester course so this is the second time this year I've taught it...we have new books (for Etymology and also for French) this year so last semester I was constantly having to prepare quizzes, handouts, etc. but this semester I can mostly reuse things. Some things I will do differently after seeing how they worked out (or didn't) last semester, but most of the materials are still fine, esp. quizzes and review games. This first week of the new Etymology class went well; I think I have a pretty good group, most of them a lot quieter than last semester's, which boasted a few kids inclined to be rowdy. The new group have been mostly quiet and quite well-behaved, though they'll loosen up more as they get used to each other and to me.

As for the distance course, this semester it's Vergil's Eclogues and Georgics and I just finished translating Eclogue 1 for tomorrow's class. It was...a lot easier than I expected Vergil to be. I don't know why but I have this irrational morbid dread of Vergil, likely because he's one major author I never read in college, and EVERY Latin student reads the Aeneid in high school if not college! But I, since I did not start Latin until college, have never read any of the Aeneid except in translation, and well, it is long and daunting. (And I do have to read it, or anyway the first half of it - six epic books!!! - for the UF master's reading list.) Even in translation I'm still somewhere around book 4...love the story, but there's so much of it, and I have six preps! Anyway, I'm loving the Eclogues and with luck that will motivate me to plow through the Aeneid too. I can't go on being the only classicist who's never read it! :-)

The phasing out of Latin and Japanese is proceeding as planned in my school district...no Latin 1 this year and I'm teaching Latin 2 for the last time. Very depressing. The only reason I'm still here is (A) I have awesome Latin students (and some decent French ones too, for the most part...) and (B) I have awesome colleagues. Not so impressed with the administration that so blithely cut our programs, but my fellow teachers are just amazing and I would sorely miss working with them. I'd really miss my Latin 2 honors class too...and the other levels...but this group is especially talented. Ten of them, sophomores and a junior, reading through Wheelock's Latin with unusual facility. I'd love to see them at work in AP Latin (and then I'd have to read the Aeneid, since that's the only AP Latin exam there will be by the time they get there...) but I'm not sure I can hold out till then. It will depend on when/if anything better opens up. I do at least have a good job, although I dread what courses they might add to my schedule next year and the year after that when I lose (next year) both Latin 2 and 2H and (after that) Latin 3. I don't want to teach another level of French with all that grading...but I have a feeling I might get stuck with the boring Prep for College class instead (at least it was boring when I had to help with a couple weeks of it last year when they were working on SAT Verbal prep), or supervision duties (not that bad actually, esp. if it's a study hall and I have a computer to work at...can get some lessons or even grading done then), or (please no!) a sophomore English class like I had when I student taught. Some of my JCL kids will probably run for state office in March; if they win, I would hate to switch schools and leave them without an experienced sponsor next year. But if the right position opens up this spring I'll probably apply. I'd like to either stay in the Indy area (it is fatiguing to even think of moving my accumulated clutter out of this apartment...) or move back closer to Jville. So that rules out leaving Indiana, except maybe for an Illinois school near Terre Haute - that could actually be closer to home than Indy is. Also, it is a must that any position I apply for be at ONLY ONE SCHOOL BUILDING. :-) I've had enough of traveling. Other than those two conditions I don't mind much what size or type of school I might go to, how big its Latin program is or isn't (I hope I've learned from "what I wish I'd done sooner" here, what I would need to do to build a small program if I go to one...), etc...Anyplace that I'm teaching more Latin than here would be a good change.

Also, there has been knitting, lots of it. It is at Ravelry but I should show some pictures here. Maybe...by spring break? There has also been much cuteness on the nephew front, likewise with pictures, likewise I don't know when they'll show up here. Owen is ten months old now and very busy!

*Latin 2, Latin 2 honors, Latin 3 honors, AP Latin Literature (level 4), French 1 (3 sections), and Etymology
** Latin 2, 3, and AP all combined period 1. Poor kids are not doing very well with this crazy arrangement.

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Ubi sum?: chez moi
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: tired tired

terrathree
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If you can speak Latin (I don't think you have to be fluent - just familiar enough with it to be comfortable with the pronunciation), Rosetta Stone is looking for participants for an audio data collection study. Once they confirm that your recordings are of good enough quality for them to use (I really don't know how good that means, but again, as long as you're comfortable with the pronunciation I think it's fine), they send you $25 for your participation. I finished the study yesterday and the $25 showed up in my PayPal today. For the study I had to record 300 phrases of Latin (and it plays a recording of each phrase first before you record yours), then 100 phrases of Pashto (and it was a really good thing that it plays a recording of those! But the idea is apparently that they are collecting recordings of a language the participant speaks well and then of a language you don't speak at all). You have to have a headset microphone, and a PayPal account for the payment.

I got an email from Rosetta Stone today saying they are still in need of 20-30 Latin participants, so if you know any Latin, go sign up! (Or other languages too...if you speak any second language(s) at all, you should look into it. I don't know how many more speakers of other languages they might need, but there were quite a few to choose from when I signed up.

For more info, or to sign up:
https://speech.rosettastone.com/

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Ubi sum?: chez moi
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: nerdy nerdy

terrathree
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Found this at sartorias' journal:



See, this is the sort of thing I try to get my Latin and French kids to do, although not about science. I had a girl write a "Rap of the Sabines" once but we couldn't get anyone to perform it. Ah, so sad.

Ubi sum?: chez moi
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: amused amused

terrathree
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Lines of Latin translated so far this week: 952

Stories that includes: [book 1] Creation, Lycaon, Deluge, Deucalion & Pyrrha, Apollo & Daphne [book 4-5] Perseus

To do this weekend: take-home midterm exam (2 hours to write an essay); go to library and check out books to research for presentation of "Ovid and Shakespeare" on Tuesday; translate first 150 lines of book 15; read a couple of assigned articles; classics department party at the professor's house on Sunday afternoon.

Next week: Monday through Thursday we continue with book 15 and maybe other stories from book 6 etc. Final exam on Thursday. Summer Latin Institute is pretty much half over!

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Ubi sum?: Florida
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: busy busy

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I've translated so much Latin this week that I had to use it for the title! This year I am attending my second Summer Latin Institute on the University of Florida campus. Spring and fall I take distance courses with UF online for my Master of Latin degree (at which I laugh, because in Latin, that degree would be called Magister Latinae....or Magistra Latinae, wouldn't it? And I'm already using that title). We have to also attend at least two of the summer institutes, eleven days of intensive Latin study. I skipped it last summer - after all, when you add in travel expenses the onsite Institute costs twice as much as tuition for the online courses, so it's not something I can indulge in too often. But this year the topic for the course is Ovid, so I had to take it. I did have an Ovid course as an undergrad, but since I started teaching Catullus and Ovid for the AP Latin class, he's become one of my favorite poets. Nobody in any language I know can turn a phrase like Publius Ovidius Naso. And few authors are such a sheer pleasure to read.

Which would explain why I worked ahead a little tonight and translated more than I needed to for tomorrow's class. Well - rather, I didn't translate all of tonight's assignment, because the last part of it is from the Daphne & Apollo story, which I've taught so many times (um...two years now, that would be. Hyperbole? Me?) that I've got various bits of it memorized. (Primus amor Phoebi Daphne Peneia, quem non fors ignara dedit sed saeva Cupidinis ira!) I have been known to pull out my Ovid text at slow moments in certamen practices and give an impromptu dramatic reading of that story. So, I think I'll be fine for those lines tomorrow, if we even get to them - haven't been covering as many lines in class as planned each day. But since I had time left in my evening when I got to the not-needing-to-be-translated-again D&A section, I skipped ahead to Book 4 and the Perseus story that we are to read for Friday and got a head start on it because it is something like 500 lines of dactyllic hexameter and ouch that's a lot of Latin to read. For context: Including what I translated of Perseus tonight, so far since Monday I've done 510 lines of Latin. On average 170 a night, but actually the first couple nights it was more like 200, then because of the not covering as much in class as planned, we were assigned less tonight so I only had 50 lines or so to do before I got to Daphne & Apollo, and then I went & did a page or so of Perseus.

And Perseus? Maybe the vocab is somewhat easier than the opening stories of Book 1 that we started with (Creation, Lycaon, the Deluge, Deucalion and Pyrrha, the Python, and then Apollo & Daphne)...actually I'm quite convinced that the vocab in the Creation section was the hardest in the whole Metamorphoses, or at least the parts of it I've any knowledge of...but anyway, by the time I got to Perseus I was just reading straight through most of it, fitting the syntax together and very seldom having to look up words. That's the best thing about the workload of these Institutes; it's tough at first but you gradually work up to being able to read the Latin pretty fluently. Considering how much I have left to read for the Master's program, that fluency is important. (Yes, I have read some of that list already. But not much. Mostly just texts covered in the courses I've taken at UF so far, plus things I teach. Need to get to work on the rest of them...)

So anyway. Day 3: 510 lines. Progress meter or something like that.

Oh, and the title says: The weather in Florida is changeable, just like the characters in the Metamorphoses. It's been alternating between sudden showers and roasting sun.

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Ubi sum?: Florida
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: working working

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Here follows a reminder of why I go to so much trouble knitting troublesome sweaters like the Baby Norgi:

Because Owen Is Cute. :-)

Photos of my nephew from last weekend: 15 weeks old now! He's already grinning, and laughing, and sitting up (with help) and standing up (with help) and drooling A LOT and sucking his thumb or more often his whole fist.

Pictures HERE! And videos too!Collapse )

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Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: pleased pleased

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So I finally got the neckband seamed on the Baby Norgi:

Baby Norgi Neckband (by durandir) Baby Norgi Neckband (by durandir)

Lovely. But as soon as it was done I noticed that...it is not a very stretchy seam. Or perhaps it was not a very stretchy bind-off. Either way, it is not a very stretchy neckband and Owen, he has a big head. By the time (Christmas-ish) that this sweater would fit him, there is no chance of his head fitting through the opening. I took it home last weekend to compare sweater to baby and this sad fact of stretchlessness was confirmed. So I'm going to have to somehow undo that neck and redo it, either with a REALLY REALLY REALLY REALLY REALLY stretchy bind-off and seam (which means time for me to go learn some new ones...) or else just reknit the neckband in ribbing, which seems the better idea presently. Sigh...

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Ubi sum?: chez moi
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: frustrated frustrated

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Knitting is a very user-friendly hobby in that you can mess it up pretty horrendously and yet still be able to rip it out and do it over right. Not too many pursuits of which that can be said! How often have you wished for a "Delete" key that would work on something you just said out loud, or a "Restore" button to let you go back to an earlier version of your life before you made some disastrous decision? (Computers have us all spoiled with their do-over capacity.) It's a good thing knitting has that potential, because I've had to do some do-overs on sweaters this month. I mean, if I were sewing and had cut the fabric out too small or the wrong shape or something...too bad! But with knitting I can do it over until I'm happy with it.

Of course that means having to rip out stitches I worked many hours to complete, and that is sometimes frustrating enough to make me just go with the imperfect version of the stitches and not try the do-over. But on my current sweater, I'm really glad I did go back and fix the problems.

I've been working since Christmas (not constantly) on the Simple Knitted Bodice. [raveled] It's a fairly simple top-down raglan sweater; raglan shoulder seams are nice on my narrow shoulders, and top-down means you can try it on as you go to be sure it'll fit. The pattern has a lace detail at the waist to fancy it up a little; the original had a beaded yarn used for the lace, but I am cheap (and not so fond of shiny things as, say, Mum :-) and am just using a contrast color. I had, soon after Christmas, gotten to the point in the pattern where you start the waist detail, worked a bit of it in the contrast color, tried it on and discovered that the waist detail was, on me, more of a bust detail. Not exactly the place I want to put lace in a contrast color, they don't need any more attention drawn to them. Soooo I had ripped back to before the waist section and let the project sit for months while trying to decide what to do.

I knew I was going to have to do some sort of bust shaping to make it work. After perusing photos of other people's versions of this project on Ravelry (the most useful thing about Ravelry, if you ask me), I thought I also needed to start the waist detail lower so the V-neck wouldn't be all stretched out of shape over my bust. I read some different tutorials on bust darts but the one that finally worked for me was in Interweave's Knitting Daily newsletter a couple of weeks ago. So on take 2 of the sweater, I measured myself and calculated everything and knit in some vertical bust darts. I worked past there till it was into the waist detail and tried it on again...

Read more...Collapse )

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Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: accomplished accomplished

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Today I knit the neckband on Baby Norgi:

Neckband (by durandir)


Now all that's left is to weave in the colorwork ends:

Neckband (by durandir)


And seam down the facing and the sweater will be DONE! Yay!

In local news, Jasonville has finally had water restored but it's not yet safe to drink and they're saying not to shower in it, either, and to boil it before washing dishes. Also, Mom & Dad's internet is down, probably because of all the rain. So I'm staying in Indy for a bit longer until the amenties of civilization are all fully restored there. :-)

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Ubi sum?: chez moi
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: sleepy sleepy

terrathree
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Almost finished Baby Norgi (by durandir)


Baby Norgi is looking much more polished today. I spent about 3 and a half hours setting in the second sleeve, sewing down the sleeve facings and the cuff & hem facings, and weaving in all the ends from the colorwork! All that's left is to pick up stitches around the neckline, knit the neckband, and sew down its facing. Then I'm done with this project finally!

I was about 4-5" into sewing down the facing on the first sleeve when I noticed:

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Ubi sum?: chez moi
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: tired tired

terrathree
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And now for KNITTING posts! Can you tell I'm on vacation now?

I just spent a little over an hour trying to finish up my Baby Norgi sweater:

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Ubi sum?: chez moi
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: creative creative

terrathree
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Indiana is still quite wet this week, but Jasonville isn't. We've had yet MORE storms even though many areas are still flooded from last weekend's downpours. Jasonville's water is still off while they work on repairing the water main broken last weekend. Estimates of when they will have water again vary from a few days to up to TEN DAYS WITHOUT WATER. Insane! Lucky for us, Mom and Dad and I all made it safely out of Jville on Sunday. Many state highways were (probably are even now) still closed from flooding or water damage (some roads collapsed, some bridges are out...), but the interstates we needed had reopened by then so they went west on 74 to Iowa, I went east on 70 to Indy. Now I am safe and dry in my second floor apartment (am so glad I don't live on the ground floor just now...Indy's not flooded yet, but just in case...) and my parents are safe with Grandma in Fort Madison. They made it to Grandpa Ray's funeral but had to leave the funeral home early from Monday's visitation because of rising water there too. Back home in Jville, the ceiling in the old nursery - a little room up some stairs that looks out over the auditorium, so one of the highest rooms in the church - collapsed because of a problem with a ceiling vent leading to water damage. So of course Dad is eager to get back home and take care of things at church...but Mom does not want to go back to a town without water and with no definite idea of when the water will be turned back on! I'm just going to stay here in Indy until I know for sure Jville has water, too. It is one of those things you don't realize how much you rely on it until you have to do without it!

I've been busy at the schools this week getting my classrooms packed for the summer. I worked at HSE on Monday and the JCL kids came to help me on Tuesday, putting things away, moving furniture away from the walls, and taking down posters from the walls, so that the wallpaper can be stripped and the walls painted. We were informed just a few days before school ended that this would be done over the summer. I asked for a clarification of what date they would start the project so I could make sure I had the walls cleared by then...because with two schools to go to on the closing day, there was no chance of me getting the room ready then. Never heard back. So on Tuesday when I came in to meet the kids and finish the room out, I was quite surprised to see the workmen already stripping the wallpaper from every other room affected by the project but mine! Guess it was a good thing we didn't schedule our JCL work day for later this week! Anyway, we got that done quickly once I had helpers, so then I took them to FHS to help with that room too. Had to pack everything up to move to a classroom just two doors down the hall, because the powers that be want all the spanish teachers next to each other and we have a new spanish teacher moving into the building. So she gets my room and I move to the Japanese teacher's room, and that teacher moves to the ENL teacher's room, and the ENL teacher moves to the next hall over. It's a bit bizarre. OK, very bizarre. Anyway, I had got most of my room packed up Friday after I finished checking out of both schools - fortunately I hadn't accumulated too much stuff there having only been in that building two years. On Tuesday, the kids helped me take down all the wall decor. Now I am just waiting for all three teachers who shared the Japanese room (she had it 3 periods, an English teacher had it 3, and a German teacher had it 1 period) to clear out their stuff and then I can redecorate. And of course once the HSE walls are done I'll have redecorating to do there, too. Maybe not quite as many posters as I had before, since odds are strong that I will only be here one more year, unless we can get Latin reinstated...

Yesterday I was at FHS again for teacher training on the new textbooks for French. I was the only French teacher there, plus about a dozen Spanish teachers from both buildings. None of the other French teachers were available for the training but I think they'll manage. We have Holt textbooks (the Bien Dit series) next year. I'm quite happy with the change, and very happy with the level of technology available for it - students can access the textbook online and all sorts of other useful things. There are online assessments and things that I hope will save me planning time, considering how many classes I have to plan for next year. Sorry, but what little creativity I'll have time for isn't often going to go to French.

Next year's schedule:
Per 1: Combined Latin 2/3/AP at FHS
Per 2: French 2
Per 3: French 1
Per 4: French 1
Per 5: Travel
Per 6 & 7: Latin 2 honors & Etymology at HSE; don't know which period each of them is, as yet.

Count them up: That's seven separate subjects to prep. And traveling during my only prep period. I think they WANT me to resign. Or they want to kill the French program as well as the Latin. It's a guaranteed recipe for ineffective teaching, anyway.

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Ubi sum?: chez moi
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: frustrated frustrated

terrathree
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Okay, so it is June 7 and already we have surpassed the average rainfall for the month of June. I'm ready for a break from all the storms. So is our whole area...I drove home to Jville last night for the weekend and parts of my drive, while the road was dry, there was standing water in the fields to either side. Last night it stormed again - something like 9 inches of rain! - and now the Vigo county area is dealing with flash flooding. We have the news on now with all the updates and so far, it looks like I can't even get back to Indy anytime soon. I-70 is closed around mile 30, and that's between Indy and where I get on the interstate (mile 23). Most of the state highways that would get me from here to I-70 are closed too. There are a couple of roads in the Terre Haute area that have collapsed under the weight of the flood water. And now they've turned off the water in Jville because the levee broke - and our local informants (neighbors who called to warn us to stockpile some water before it was turned off, I love small towns :-) say it will be off for three days!

Dad and (possibly) Mom were getting set to drive out to Iowa tomorrow for Grandpa Ray's funeral. (FYI for those not related to me: My step-grandfather, who married Grandma Bush after his first wife died and Grandma had been widowed some years - Grandpa Bush died before I was born. Grandpa Ray & Grandma got married when all the grandkids were still pretty young so we've grown up pretty close to him. He died peacefully in his sleep.) The funeral is on Tuesday so I can't go because I've got JCL kids coming in that day to help with my classroom. Dad was going for sure & Mom was considering it, not sure if the hours of driving would be too much for her. When we heard about the water being turned off, Dad thought he and Mom ought to just go & take the opportunity to get out of town. But then...roads flooded. I'm hoping I can get back to Indy in time for the JCL work day on Tuesday, too...that can always be rescheduled, of course.

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Ubi sum?: jville
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: calm calm

terrathree
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I would just like to say that
I am done with grading for the year!

Which of course means now I have time to ramble on the journal.Collapse )

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Ubi sum?: chez moi
Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: busy busy, but with breathing space now
Qualem musicam nunc audio?: Salvador - Waterfall

terrathree
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Apparently yesterday was my Ravel-versary. I was filling out a survey about Ravelry that asked how long you had been on Ravelry, and when I went to my Rav profile to check, it says member since May 21, 2007! I'm amazed it's been that long. And it's still in Beta! But the waiting list is down to just a few hundred people so that generally if you request an invite to Ravelry you'll get it within a day or so, so it's practically "gone public" anyway. Except that without requesting an invite you can't go see my profile or anything else there. If you do any knitting, crocheting, spinning, or have ever wanted to learn, you might as well get a Ravelry account and check it out. It's like a virtual crafting scrapbook that also lets you see everyone else's scrapbooks - the most useful thing for me is that you can see other people's finished projects for a pattern that you are considering, and see how they turned out and if anyone made alterations that could be useful.

So the Ravelry year has gone surprisingly quickly, and the school year is quickly coming to an end too. Two more weeks to go, including finals. I am so behind on grading...and now I have final exam essays to grade too. Seniors' grades are due next Thursday so I am going to have to prioritize and get their work graded first, then catch up with underclassmen. I've been sick for a week and a half - since last Tuesday - with a really annoying cold, and have gotten even further behind on the grading because cold medicine and objective grading of papers just do not mix. I even stayed home from school last Wednesday, and I almost never stay home sick (because it's more work to get sub plans ready for an esoteric subject like mine than it is to just show up even when miserably sick and slog through the day). I brought home grading optimistically but was in bed most of the day, too far from consciousness to even think about grading. I'm going to have to start putting more assignments on the computer next year to be automatically graded - we have classroom management web sites (Angel) now that include assessments. At least then the kids would get some timely feedback more often.

Last night was "Hit the Books" night at HSE, where teachers voluntarily (some of us) make ourselves available in the evening for students to come get help, study for the final, or work on term projects. I only had four or five kids show up but it was productive. Three of my certaminers were there at the end - none of whom really needed much extra help with Latin, of course! - and I pulled up some computer drills I have in powerpoint. These are things I have used in class at times for a drill, where it'll show a question, I call on a kid to answer, and I click to show the answer. Mostly simple things like verb transformations, changing the tense, or memory drills to recite principal parts of verbs, etc. They were REALLY into it! At the end we were doing a drill on imperfect tense and they were racing each other to shout out the answers. I am always a little surprised when I have kids having that much fun with GRAMMAR. But, well, they are certamen kids.

More to write later, time permitting - much knitting to show off, and also big news for my dad this Tuesday! But I am writing this during the study hall I supervise and the final bell is about to ring so I can go home and take more cold medicine.

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Qualem habitum animi nunc patior?: sick sick